Architectural Details in Quebec City Pt 2/3

Landscapes are great but I love to photograph architecture. I especially love the details that we often forget about once we’ve admired a building as a whole – especially the doors and the windows. The following photos show some of my favourites from my trip to Quebec City last month.

Doors on buildings in Old Quebec are wonderfully unique. It's like the architect who works with stone decided to add a touch of his own personality - or the carpenter that wanted to show off his woodworking skills. This door was on a side street - a residential street that isn't typically part of the tourist area. Note the carvings and gorgeous teal blue colour.

Doors on buildings in Old Quebec are wonderfully unique. It’s like the architect who works with stone decided to add a touch of his own personality – or the carpenter that wanted to show off his woodworking skills. This door was on a side street – a residential street that isn’t typically part of the tourist area. Note the carvings and gorgeous teal blue colour.

I could even write about hardware but let’s look at another door:

Q Doors 3

These matching doors – one in the vestibule and one upon entering the house were photographed at “La Maison de Nos Ancetres”. It’s a 19th century building with a wide front porch that faces the main road. The back of the building faces the water. This is the “go-to” place for anyone wishing to do genealogical research in L’Ile D’Orleans. Note the stained glass on the outer door. Love these!

Here’s a picture that shows ingenuity in building:

Quebec doors 2

These doors are beautiful in terms of detail but look at how they needed to be installed in order to compensate for the steep grade of the street. I’m assuming that it could be a bit awkward to access the building but I suppose you’d get used to it. This door is located on a street that bears my family’s ancestral name.

I just had to take a picture of this building. It goes to show the extreme efforts it takes to restore a historic building:

Quebec restoration

I don’t know anything specific about this building but it’s located not far from the Plains of Abraham. (Between La Grande Allee and the Plains) I can only imagine what it would cost to restore it because it’s in serious disrepair.

Here’s a detail of the work that needs to be done:

Quebec Rotted pillar

Detail showing the rot that permeates the tall wooden pillars.

Often I take photographs looking outside from within a room. I do this with the idea of possibly painting some of the scenes.

Q windows 3

Looking onto the water that surround Ile D’Orleans. Taken from our bedroom window at the B&B we stayed at on the island: “Dans Les Bras de Morphee”

Q Windows 7

I love the simplicity of these antique windows and the wide sills below them due to the thick walls. This image shows a window that opens into the room and another window which is rather like a storm window. What’s different in many of the windows here is that some of the storm panes actually slide left or right to allow air into the room. Can you tell which pane? It’s the one on the right & center.

Q windows 2

Here’s the view outside our room in Quebec City – definitely an urban setting. Look at the corner building outside the window and note way builders made more room in their homes – by extending the upper floors over the street. I was told this was due to the way houses were taxed – by the size of the building at street level. Canny builders!

And finally an image that speaks to my soul:

Q Windows 5

This photo was taken in the attic of the Manoir Mauvais-Geneste in Ile D’Orleans. It was built and added on between 1734 and 1755. The spirit of our Canadian past still lives here. If only walls could talk.

 

4 responses to “Architectural Details in Quebec City Pt 2/3

  1. beautiful shots and so many interesting details Johanne. Love the doors and windows and the view out.

  2. Beautiful post, Joanne! I lived in Quebec City for 2 years while I was going to school and it truly is a magnificent city. I loved all the history, architecture, food, people etc….

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